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Frequently Asked Questions

1.  Is Clickbank secure?

2.  What is Google Earth and how do I get it?

3.  What is the idea behind Video History Today?

4.  Why is the footage so 'raw'?

5.  Why are there very few images taken inside major museums?

6.  How have the video clips been edited?

7.  Windows Moviemaker stops responding when I try to save a large movie file?


1.  Is Clickbank secure?


Clickbank is the Internet’s leading retailer of digital products.  It is totally secure: your credit card data is passed directly to Clickbank and no one but Clickbank has access to your sensitive information.



2.  What is Google Earth and how do I get it?


Google Earth is one of the best free applications available on the internet (LINK TO GOOGLE HERE).  It allows users to see just about any place on the planet from a birds eye perspective.    Hours and hours can be wasted just checking out those famous places we all want to visit.


Built into Google Earth are many tools (and Google are adding more all the time) which further enhance the application.  


Nothing beats visiting a location but this amazing tool makes it possible to see the layout of just about any famous historical location in the world..  


3.  What is the idea behind Video History Today?


The aim of Video History Today is firstly to show young people what a location that they may have heard about actually looks like.  Teachers and other educators can therefore use the clips to help create a short video for group discussion perhaps.  Ultimately, the concept behind Video History Today is to get the students themselves to use the video to create their own documentaries, their own stories and learn about an historical event through video.


4.  Why is the footage so 'raw'?


Firstly, the Video History Today content is not designed to be entertaining or educational in its own right.  The video essay concept is designed to leave the use of the content down to the imagination of the user and encourage the user to be creative in adapting the raw clips from Video History Today to suit a particular project.


Secondly the plan is for users to contribute their own video content in the future and therefore the aim early on is to establish a 'type' or 'brand' of handheld video that users can replicate quite easily.

 


5.  Why are there very few images taken inside major museums?


There are several reasons for this linked to access, cost and copyright protection.   Many museums have strict rules with regard to photography, some banning it completely while others allow it for personal use only.  Access can be arranged for commercial photography but the minimum price (in London) is £350 per hour.  Unfortunately this is beyond the finances of a small organization like Video History Today.


6.  How have the video clips been edited?


The video recorded on location is collated and sorted into appropriate files.  The clips are generally saved by editing the length depending on content, camera shake and sound.  On some occasions, the sound heard on the clip has been reduced slightly in volume from the original sound recorded to improve the user experience.


On a few occasions, where background noise (cars passing off camera, voices, wind etc) has completely taken over the video, the sound on the clip has been replaced completely by sound recorded on a different video clip at the same location.  In other words, a small number of video clips have had the original sound replaced.  Important: Where this happens only sound recorded at the same location is used.


7.  Windows Moviemaker stops responding when I try to save a large movie file?


Sometimes Windows Moviemaker just hangs in the middle of an operation or perhaps when you are trying to save a file.  This link takes you to the Microsoft help page for this issue.